I’m on holiday!

As of tomorrow afternoon, I’ll be away up Northern England visiting the Lake District with some good friends of mine until Sunday. You probably won’t hear much from me during this period. I might be posting a little on my Instagram account if anything! I should have a queue running during my away time, so I hope you enjoy that! As for any questions, I probably won’t be able to answer them until the Monday.

This is just a heads up incase anyone wonders where I have got to :) I can’t wait to see what’s up there, and hopefully get the chance to get some rare pictures! At least for someone who lives in one of the flattest parts of England! Anyway, I should probably think about what to pack pretty soon! 

Adam - Stereocolours

Anonymous: I have one question: I wanna start make really good photo, but I haven't much money, it's better buy a economic reflex (like Nikon or canon) Or wait when I can buy a canon like yours?

Well, a good camera doesn’t take a good picture :) If you can’t afford a good one for now, maybe get something cheap and learn it inside and out! Make the most of what you can get. You can learn a lot from even the most basic set up. 
That said, I would always say it’s worth getting something which lasts. If saving for a few months extra gets you the next model up, then that could save you a year from upgrading it. Or more! 

Anonymous: I've just seen your lightening picture and was wondering, how did you go about actually taking the photo? Since it all happens really fast, I found it really hard!

Hey Anon!
Thanks, this was my first proper shot at shooting lightning, and unfortunately we managed to get set up just as the storm was coming overhead, so I never got more than a few shots at it :(

As for tips, from my limited experience, here are what I would consider top tips for night lightning shooting (feel free to correct me, I know some of you guys have some incredible shots!):
-Shoot in Bulb mode with your camera. The idea behind this is you hold the shutter down for as long as you can, and as soon as the lightning strikes, you take your finger off. (More on why below) If you can’t 
-Lightning is VERY bright. Shoot at no higher than 100-800 iso, depending upon how many clouds are about and how the light pollution sits. 
-Put your f/ stop fairly low. You can go slightly higher if you wish to do a longer exposure and capture more of the image. You can be flexible with this depending upon how far away the lightning is, and how bright the picture will be. Pros and cons to using a higher (you get more detail in the shot + the lightning is darker and more detailed) but (you might not capture the finer streaks as they are too dark to show up, the entire shot is really dark)
-Set your focus using a streetlight or something about 1-2 miles away. The problem with lightning is there are usually clouds. Clouds are notoriously hard to focus on (especially at night), and they block out the stars, which are usually what you use to set focus just before infinity.
-Use a tripod and remote if possible
-Time-lapse technology is really good! You want to keep exposing for as long as possible and the minimising ‘down time’ intervals between shots so you don’t miss any strikes.

As for safety, this guide might be more useful that I can be!
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/06/0623_040623_lightningfacts_2.html

Hope this helps!

yeahermyeah: Did you make your theme yourself? I really like it. Its different

Thanks! I customised it, but it certainly is not my own theme! It’s a really beautiful theme and unfortunately, I have forgotten the name of it… I just spent 20 minutes trying to find it again, sorry! I can’t even find it in the HTML code, but if I find it, i’ll be sure to let everyone know, as it’s well worth giving credit to the incredible designer.

EDIT: http://publishertheme.tumblr.com/

Anonymous: I love your photo, you are amazing, i hope one day i will can Make photos like you, Sorry for my English ;)

Hey thank you! I’m sure your stuff is brilliant.
Your English was great, I don’t know how to speak another language so thanks for spending the time to write in! :)

Adam Marshall Photography Prints | Tumblr | Facebook | Flickr
So this was the best shot I got tonight out of a couple of attempts. I only managed to get 5 or so minutes of shooting before I had to move due to the rain and storm getting closer! Nothing visually spectacular, there were much better strikes, but one day I’ll get a good one!
Still, I love storms and watching it with some friends was both fascinating and fulfilling.
  • Camera: Canon EOS 70D
  • Aperture: f/4
  • Exposure: 15"
  • Focal Length: 74mm

Adam Marshall Photography 
Prints | Tumblr | Facebook | Flickr

So this was the best shot I got tonight out of a couple of attempts. I only managed to get 5 or so minutes of shooting before I had to move due to the rain and storm getting closer! Nothing visually spectacular, there were much better strikes, but one day I’ll get a good one!

Still, I love storms and watching it with some friends was both fascinating and fulfilling.

ffffccccv replied to your post: Adam Marshall Photography Prints …

You should be able to correct one frame and apply the temperature + tint to each frame in a batch. Using Bridge+CameraRaw this is actually quite easy.

You’re absolutely right! Let me have a go at this tomorrow :) See if I can sort it out manually. It’s not the worst example of flicker either!

Tonight, I went chasing storms!

I got one successful shot but I think it’s too bright. It got too dangerous to stay out after that. Missed the best of it unfortunately.

Adam Marshall Photography Prints | Tumblr | Facebook | Flickr
So I did a cool thing, but it was actually a bad thing. I wasn’t going to upload it, but figured I might as well for ‘learning purposes’ (also as a way of slapping myself on the wrists for forgetting). So there’s a lot of storms over in the UK right now due to the hot weather, it went from 20 degrees to 30 degrees in a few hours where I lived. I woke up to dark grey skies and thundering rain. The forecast said it would get sunny an hour afterwards (and it did!) so I got the camera out and did a short time-lapse of the puddle evaporating, with the sun passing over the reflection. 
The idea itself is pretty cool, I love watching these things happen, but my problem was that I left the auto white-balance feature on, despite turning everything else manual. This means that when I processed the picture, any adjustment results in an offset value with the next, due to the curves for RGB differing between frames. The white balance changed while the camera noticed there was less dark reds in the beginning of the frame, less whites, and more light reds etc. and compensated for this automatically.
So I thought i’d upload this anyway, because it’s cool, and serves as a purpose to help anyone avoid this problem. This is me saying, don’t leave your settings on auto when shooting a time-lapse. Or try not to forget like myself, and change everything to manual!
Adam - Stereocolours

Adam Marshall Photography 
Prints | Tumblr | Facebook | Flickr

So I did a cool thing, but it was actually a bad thing. I wasn’t going to upload it, but figured I might as well for ‘learning purposes’ (also as a way of slapping myself on the wrists for forgetting). So there’s a lot of storms over in the UK right now due to the hot weather, it went from 20 degrees to 30 degrees in a few hours where I lived. I woke up to dark grey skies and thundering rain. The forecast said it would get sunny an hour afterwards (and it did!) so I got the camera out and did a short time-lapse of the puddle evaporating, with the sun passing over the reflection. 

The idea itself is pretty cool, I love watching these things happen, but my problem was that I left the auto white-balance feature on, despite turning everything else manual. This means that when I processed the picture, any adjustment results in an offset value with the next, due to the curves for RGB differing between frames. The white balance changed while the camera noticed there was less dark reds in the beginning of the frame, less whites, and more light reds etc. and compensated for this automatically.

So I thought i’d upload this anyway, because it’s cool, and serves as a purpose to help anyone avoid this problem. This is me saying, don’t leave your settings on auto when shooting a time-lapse. Or try not to forget like myself, and change everything to manual!

Adam - Stereocolours